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The most important rule for managing your Agile project team’s velocity [VIDEO] May 1, 2013

Posted by HubTechInsider in Agile Software Development, Product Management, Project Management.
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You’re reading Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a blog stuffed with years of articles about Boston technology startups and venture capital-backed companies, software developmentAgile project managementmanaging software teams, designing web-based business applications, running successful software development projectsecommerce and telecommunications.

About the author.

I’m Paul Seibert, Editor of Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a Boston focused technology blog. I have been working in the software engineering and ecommerce industries for over fifteen years. My interests include computers, electronics, robotics and programmable microcontrollers, and I am an avid outdoorsman and guitar player. You can connect with me on LinkedIn, follow me on Twitter, follow me on Quora, even friend me on Facebook if you’re cool. I own and am trying to sell a dual-zoned, residential & commercial Office Building in Natick, MA. I have a background in entrepreneurshipecommercetelecommunications and software development, I’m a PMO Director, a serial entrepreneur and the co-founder of several ecommerce and web-based software startups, the latest of which is Tshirtnow.net.

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Boston Project Manager, Paul Seibert April 24, 2013

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Boston Project Manager, Paul Seibert

Want to know more?

You’re reading Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a blog stuffed with years of articles about Boston technology startups and venture capital-backed companies, software development, Agile project management, managing software teams, designing web-based business applications, running successful software development projects, ecommerce and telecommunications.

About the author.

I’m Paul Seibert, Editor of Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a Boston focused technology blog. I have been working in the software engineering and ecommerce industries for over fifteen years. My interests include computers, electronics, robotics and programmable microcontrollers, and I am an avid outdoorsman and guitar player. You can connect with me on LinkedIn, follow me on Twitter, follow me on Quora, even friend me on Facebook if you’re cool. I own and am trying to sell a dual-zoned, residential & commercial Office Building in Natick, MA. I have a background in entrepreneurship, ecommerce, telecommunications and software development, I’m a PMO Director, a serial entrepreneur and the co-founder of several ecommerce and web-based software startups, the latest of which is Tshirtnow.net.

How many stock options should executives at a startup company be granted? November 28, 2010

Posted by HubTechInsider in Acquisitions, Boston Executive Moves, Investing, IPOs, Staffing & Recruiting, Startups, Venture Capital.
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A typical North American office

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How many stock options should executives at a startup company be granted?

The Going Rates for Senior Executives’ Stock Options in the Boston area, 2011:

A President or CEO of a startup may typically receive anywhere from 6% to 10% of the company’s stock. The actual percentage of stock granted to the CEO will depend upon such factors as the company’s life stage and financial stability and revenue outlook when the new CEO signs on for employment. The earlier in the company’s formationary period the new CEO signs on, the higher the percentage of stock granted to him may be.

A Senior Vice President of a startup may typically receive anywhere from 1% to 3% of the startup’s stock. In general, and this is across many industries that startups participate in in the Boston area, those with a marketing and sales pedigree are rewarded toward the higher range and those with a financial orientation toward the lower range. This is often due to the fact that very top-notch marketing and sales executives are sinmply harder to find because of intense competition in the Boston area, and when they succeed, they add signigficantly to the bottom line of a startup company’s revenue outlook. In contrast, consider that senior Financial executives are essential to reassure skitish venture, angel and other early stage startup capital funding institutional and individual investors, but they can’t usually stake a claim to having increased sales.

A Vice President or a Key Manager of a startup company in the Boston area may expect to receive (or in the Boston area, may expect to have had to have negociated strongly for) .5% to 2% of a startup company’s stock. A Vice President of sales or a manager of technolgy would be liklier to command toward the higher end of this range of stock percentages, while a Vice President of finance or manufacturing would probably be at the lower end. As I outlined above with Senior Vice Presidents, those with marketing and sales expertise have the greatest amount of leverage. Executives and managers below these senior levels usually receive something less than .5% of the startup’s stock in the Boston area.

I should point out with some stridency that the above stock percentages that I have outlined can be misleading, and I advise starup senior management teams, hr directors, boards of directors, investors, and job seekers to take the above guidelines with care. In the Boston area, a great deal of savvy negociations by knowledgable parties, all armed with a great deal of stock option terminology and business experience, would have to be conducted to arrive at stock option structures like the ones above.

The actual percentage of a startup company that an employee receives in options is much less important than its potential value. Having 10% of a company that’s unlikely to exceed $1 million in value is much less desirable than having 1% of a company that has a good chance of being worth $100 million.

Want to know more?

You’re reading Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a blog stuffed with years of articles about Boston technology startups and venture capital-backed companies,software development, Agile project management, managing software teams, designing web-based business applications, running successful software development projects, ecommerce and telecommunications.

About the author.

I’m Paul Seibert, Editor of Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a Boston focused technology blog. I have been working in the software engineering and ecommerce industries for over fifteen years. My interests include electronics, robotics and programmable microcontrollers, and I am an avid outdoorsman and guitar player. You can connect with me on LinkedIn, follow me on Twitter, even friend me on Facebook if you’re cool.

I own and am trying to sell a dual-zoned, residential & commercial Office Building in Natick, MA. I have a background in entrepreneurship, ecommerce, telecommunications and software development, I’m the Director, Technical Projects at eSpendWise, I’m a serial entrepreneur and the co-founder of Tshirtnow.net.



What is a User Story? How are they used in Requirements Gathering and in writing User Acceptance Tests? October 3, 2010

Posted by HubTechInsider in Agile Software Development, Definitions, Project Management.
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user stories image

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What is a User Story? How are they used in Requirements Gathering and in writing User Acceptance Tests?

User Stories are short conversational texts that are used for initial requirements discovery and project planning. User stories are widely used in conjunction with agile software development project management methodologies for Release Planning and definition of User Acceptance Criteria for software development projects.

User Goals, stated in the form of User Stories, are more closely aligned with Business Priorities than software development Tasks and so it is the User Story format which prevails in written statements of User Acceptance Criteria.

An Agile Project Team is typically oriented to completing and delivering User-valued Features rather than on completing isolated development Tasks.These development Tasks eventually combine into a User-valued Feature).

User Goals are not the same things as software development Tasks. A User Goal is an end condition, whereas a development Task is an intermediate process needed to achieve this User Goal. To help illustrate this point, here are two example scenarios:

1. If my User Goal is to laze in my hammock reading the Sunday Boston Globe newspaper, I first have to mow the lawn. My Task is mowing; My Goal is resting. If I was able to recruit someone else to mow the lawn, I could achieve my Goal without having to do the mowing, the Task.

2. Tasks change as implementation technology or development approaches change, but Goals have the pleasant property of remaining stable on software development projects. For example, if I am a hypothetical User traveling from Boston to San Francisco, my User Goals for the trip might include Speed, Comfort and Safety. Heading for California on this proposed trip in 1850, I would have made the journey in a high technology Conestoga wagon for Speed and Comfort, and I would have brought along a Winchester rifle for Safety. However, making the same trip in 2010, with the same User Goals, I would now make the journey in a new Boeing 777 for updated Speed and Comfort and for Safety’s sake I would now leave the Winchester rifle at home.

· My User Goals remained unchanged, however the Tasks have changed so much that they are now seemingly in direct opposition. User Goals are steady, software development Tasks as stated on SOWs (Statements Of Work) are transient.

· Designing User Acceptance Criteria around software development Tasks rarely suits, but User Acceptance Criteria based on User Goals always does.

A User Story is a brief description of functionality as viewed by a User or Customer of the System. User Stories are free-form, and there is no mandatory syntax. However, it can be useful to think of a User Story as generally fitting this form:

“As a <type of User>, I want <Capability> so that <Business Value>”.

Using this template as an example, we might have a User Story like this one:

“As a Store Manager, I want to search for a Service Ticket by Store so that I can find the right Service Ticket quickly”.

User stories form the basis of User Acceptance Testing. Acceptance tests can be created to verify that the User Story has been correctly implemented.

User Story Card

Want to know more?

You’re reading Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a blog stuffed with years of articles about Boston technology startups and venture capital-backed companies,software developmentAgile project managementmanaging software teams, designing web-based business applications, running successful software development projectsecommerce and telecommunications.

About the author.

I’m Paul Seibert, Editor of Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a Boston focused technology blog. You can connect with me on LinkedIn, follow me on Twitter, even friend me on Facebook if you’re cool. I own and am trying to sell a dual-zoned, residential & commercial Office Building in Natick, MA. I have a background in entrepreneurshipecommercetelecommunications andsoftware development, I’m the Director, Technical Projects at eSpendWise, I’m a serial entrepreneur and the co-founder of Tshirtnow.net.

What is an ACNA? What is a CCNA code in telecommunications? June 8, 2009

Posted by HubTechInsider in Definitions, Fiber Optics, Telecommunications, Uncategorized.
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An ACNA stands for Access Customer Name Abbreviation; It is a three-digit alpha code assigned to identify carriers, both ILECs (Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers) and CLECs (Competitive Local Exchange Carriers), for billing and other identification purposes.

It is closely related to the CCNA code, or the Customer Carrier Name Abbreviation, which identifies the common language code for the IXC (InterExchange Carrier) providing the interLATA facility.

The CCNA reflects the code to be contacted for provisioning whereas the ACNA reflects the IXC to be billed for the service.

Geek T-Shirts, Decals, and more at http://www.tshirtnow.net

Want to know more?

You’re reading Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a blog stuffed with years of articles about Boston technology startups and venture capital-backed companies, software development, Agile project management, managing software teams, designing web-based business applications, running successful software development projects, ecommerce and telecommunications.

About the author.

I’m Paul Seibert, Editor of Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a Boston focused technology blog. You can connect with me on LinkedIn, follow me on Twitter, even friend me on Facebook if you’re cool. I own and am trying to sell a dual-zoned, residential & commercial Office Building in Natick, MA. I have a background in entrepreneurship, ecommerce, telecommunications and software development, I’m the Senior Technical Project Manager at eSpendWise, I’m a serial entrepreneur and the co-founder of Tshirtnow.net.

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What is the Mu-Law PCM voice coding standard used in North American T-Carrier telecommunications transmission systems? June 8, 2009

Posted by HubTechInsider in Definitions, Telecommunications, VUI Voice User Interface.
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Sampling and 4-bit quantization of an analog s...

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Mu-Law encoding is the PCM voice coding standard used in Japan and North America. It is a companding standard, both compressing the input and expanding the data upon opening after transmission. Mu Law is a PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) encoding algorithm where the analog voice signal is sampled eight thousand times per second, with each sample being represented by eight bits, thus yielding a raw transmission rate of 64 Kps. Each sample consists of a sign bit, a three bit segment which specifies a logarithmic rqange, and a four bit step offset into the range. The bits of the sample are inverted before transmission. A Law encoding is the voice coding standard which is used in Europe.

Want to know more?

You’re reading Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a blog stuffed with years of articles about Boston technology startups and venture capital-backed companies, software development, Agile project management, managing software teams, designing web-based business applications, running successful software development projects, ecommerce and telecommunications.

About the author.

I’m Paul Seibert, Editor of Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a Boston focused technology blog. You can connect with me on LinkedIn, follow me on Twitter, even friend me on Facebook if you’re cool. I own and am trying to sell a dual-zoned, residential & commercial Office Building in Natick, MA. I have a background in entrepreneurship, ecommerce, telecommunications and software development, I’m the Senior Technical Project Manager at eSpendWise, I’m a serial entrepreneur and the co-founder of Tshirtnow.net.

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