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What is an ACNA? What is a CCNA code in telecommunications? June 8, 2009

Posted by HubTechInsider in Definitions, Fiber Optics, Telecommunications, Uncategorized.
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An ACNA stands for Access Customer Name Abbreviation; It is a three-digit alpha code assigned to identify carriers, both ILECs (Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers) and CLECs (Competitive Local Exchange Carriers), for billing and other identification purposes.

It is closely related to the CCNA code, or the Customer Carrier Name Abbreviation, which identifies the common language code for the IXC (InterExchange Carrier) providing the interLATA facility.

The CCNA reflects the code to be contacted for provisioning whereas the ACNA reflects the IXC to be billed for the service.

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What is the Mu-Law PCM voice coding standard used in North American T-Carrier telecommunications transmission systems? June 8, 2009

Posted by HubTechInsider in Definitions, Telecommunications, VUI Voice User Interface.
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Sampling and 4-bit quantization of an analog s...

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Mu-Law encoding is the PCM voice coding standard used in Japan and North America. It is a companding standard, both compressing the input and expanding the data upon opening after transmission. Mu Law is a PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) encoding algorithm where the analog voice signal is sampled eight thousand times per second, with each sample being represented by eight bits, thus yielding a raw transmission rate of 64 Kps. Each sample consists of a sign bit, a three bit segment which specifies a logarithmic rqange, and a four bit step offset into the range. The bits of the sample are inverted before transmission. A Law encoding is the voice coding standard which is used in Europe.

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You’re reading Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a blog stuffed with years of articles about Boston technology startups and venture capital-backed companies, software development, Agile project management, managing software teams, designing web-based business applications, running successful software development projects, ecommerce and telecommunications.

About the author.

I’m Paul Seibert, Editor of Boston’s Hub Tech Insider, a Boston focused technology blog. You can connect with me on LinkedIn, follow me on Twitter, even friend me on Facebook if you’re cool. I own and am trying to sell a dual-zoned, residential & commercial Office Building in Natick, MA. I have a background in entrepreneurship, ecommerce, telecommunications and software development, I’m the Senior Technical Project Manager at eSpendWise, I’m a serial entrepreneur and the co-founder of Tshirtnow.net.

Burlington, MA-based Exa sells Supercomputing as an on-demand service in the Cloud June 8, 2009

Posted by HubTechInsider in Supercomputing.
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Burlington, MA-based Exa sells supercomputing cycles as a Cloud service over the Internet.

Exa is a privately held 170-person outfit in burlington, MA that sells supercomputer time by the slice. The company was launched in 1992 by selling fluid dynamics simulation software one of its MIT founders created while a professor there.

The company owns a network of 3,500 Intel and AMD-based servers and has the capability to rent thousands more. These servers are housed by IBM in their Poughkeepsie, NY data center.

Exa charges around a dollar per processor core per hour for the supercomputer time, which is offered over the Internet using Exa’s modeling software as a “Cloud computing” option, much as Google lets users access documents and spreadsheets over the web or Amazon’s EC2 service rents out simple processing and storage capability.

Exa’s had revenues of $34 million in 2008, with on-demand supercomputer services accounting for $10.5 MM, up from 48% in 2007. Software sales grew a mere 13% to $21 million last year.

Selling supercomputing as a service is still just a tiny fraction of the $9.8 billion market for high-performance computing. But others such as oil-services firm Schlumberger are also selling supercomputing services to a select client base and industry vertical.

Exa has several customers with “bursty” supercomputing needs, such as Dodge and Peugeot, the U.S. National Bobsled Team, and tractor manufacturer Agco.

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